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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
all know, the german marshall fund vehicle very kind to provide us with this -- has been very kind to provided us with this opportunity to have four of their european experts in bicycle planning, bicycle implementation and bicycle programs and they are experts on all aspects of the bicycle. and here in san francisco, you know, we are at this point trying to after a hiatus of three years because of court-ordered injunctions trying to implement our bike plan. so we all a collective goal, i believe, to increase the environmental and nick sustainability of the world around us that we participate in and especially in san francisco, but we do have a special responsibility because this place provides us with the opportunity that most other places don't. the geometry and geography of san francisco is up that it is easier for us being in a city of short trips to veil ourselves to other alternatives to the car. so when we want to reclaim the street and the public right-of-way and the public realm for people and basic human needs of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we
, the status of the car has changed. people are not used to having cars anymore. they sometimes use a car and go to a car sharing club or something. it is socially acceptable to cycle. 30, 40 years ago, you would maybe be seen as a loser if he came on a bicycle, -- if you came on a bicycle, but now it is for everybody. everyone is cycling. it is not, the former generation in the 60's, denmark, they could afford to buy a car and they really enjoyed it. they wanted to show it, and all trips they made or made by cars, the the new generation has a completely different view. >> i already gave my answer during my presentation. it is everything, especially if it is business or businessmen, it is money driven. show it is comparative in cost or it is less cost for business. because if you show that, there is a discussion. >> let me ask before i go to the next question, what in your experience the you believe was the most influential and excepting the different stages of the car and its role in the city? i am sure over 40 years, your attitudes toward the automobile have changed. what do you believe
for us. the mobility plans that local authorities are now obliged to develop, and the hearings that are organized because of that, are almost always concerning parking places. we have now a program where we are having one less car parking space. in the streets, you see, there is one car less because now bicycles can ride their bikes, but the comments are not as enthusiastic. you will have to be from the cycling movement to be happy about that. it is a hard struggle. >> you, sir? >> with health insurance, i think people are realizing it is an idea whose time has come. maybe we're trying to make the same thing with cycling. in the united states, many people, especially in big cities, are much more resistant to the idea, including individual motorists, not just businesses afraid of profit. i am wondering, i am not sure how much a european have met with people who are very resistant, thinking it is like socialism, people just want to take over the streets and will not be room for cars and we will go slower and lose jobs. have you been able to convince people? what kind of arguments
generation san franciscan. the best days are absolutely ahead of us. there is no doubt in my mind. i love our challenges. i really do. but our opportunities are limitless and less -- when we have good leaders. be involved in these races. even in districts you do not reside in. get involved. can i make it any more clear? enough of it me. now to the happy and optimistic future that is america's cup. we have a video that i think will enliven your senses, will give you a real sense of optimism about our prospects to generate $1.4 billion in economic activity, 840,000 jobs, a decision will be next -- made in the next 30 days. we are competing with two other governments. if you are from spain, italy, please do something to make things -- well, rome is competing against us. here we are, 47.5-square-mile city competing against these two countries. we are close. this is what we are fighting for. >> and usa is leading. america's cup 33 has been decided on the water. the america's cup is the american again. [applause] >> thank you, mayor newsom. i could not see that, but i am sure it was thrilling. mari
, yeah, but all these lanes are needed for car traffic. i'll tell you, if you use this traffic model, you should realize that the capacity of your system is not determined by the amount of lanes and the stretches of roads but by the capacity of intersections and you realize that the capacity of these intersections are a lot lower than any capacity of lanes that are on the stretches of roads. so it's only a parking place for cars on to the next traffic light or intersection. so it's only convincing the people to realize that there will be hardly any sacrifice if there will be face given over to cyclists. one thing and that's also the problem with being in the downturn because there is also safe by numbers. in the netherlands, cycling is inherently more safe than in the u.s.a. because all car drivers are also cyclists. 60% of the people in the netherlands cycle at least three times a week. 80% at least once a week. so all the car drivers are also cyclists and they know as they turn right that there is an 80% chance that they will cut off a cyclist if they don't look. so there is also safety
morning, everyone. they keep for having us here today. that was a great video. i think it rivals our videos now. after 40 years of planning, debating, talking about it, we are finally constructing the transbay transit center. it is remarkable for many of us who have been working on this for so long. as the mayor indicated, we had a wonderful groundbreaking on august 11. we had the u.s. secretary of transportation ray lahood, speaker of the house nancy pelosi, senator boxer, mayor newsom, who has been supporting this project since he was a supervisor, and the california high speed rail authority, all on hand to celebrate the groundbreaking of the first high-speed rail station in the united states. the first modern bus station built in this country in the past 40 years. on august 6 in the evening, we shut down the existing transbay terminal. the next day on august 7, we started operations at the temporary facility at main and beale. we are currently in demolition. so far, we have demolished the east ramp on howard we are working now on the west ramp. then we will have the demolition of
? >> yes. >> tell us about them. what are the models, now, not just california, certainly not just the bay area. >> there are gardens growing everywhere. and there were a long time ago. this isn't anything new. but the idea of connecting the garden to the kitchen to the table and back to the garden again is the whole cycle. that is really transformational and important that we do. that we just don't have one little piece. the whole thing really makes sense. you don't want to have a cafeteria that is inconsistent with the way you are growing food in the garden. >> is it your belief that every public school can and i assume should do this? >> i really believe that. when you see this and everybody can come. we have 1,000 visitors a year and over the 12 years, a lot of people have come into the garden. when you see the program and see the kids doing this, you believe every school should be like this. there are montessori schools and all schools in europe and around the world where there is the way the children are fed, food locally produced and food that is ripe and in season. >> you have a bo
them from us? i said sure. she said, the only thing>> local jail owned and operated. you were that definitive? >> i have had lots of experiences with farming, over the phone, you don't know what to expect. she said i want you to come out and see this project before you make a decision. i went out to the jail in san baru.n. o. she had 7 acres of land planted. she said tell alice about what is going on here. this one guy said hey, you know, i have only been working in the garden for one day and this is the best day of my life. 21 years old, in and out of jail a couple of days. i said i am buying the vegetables. [laughter] doesn't matter to me. it turned out to be an incredible relationship. what was so beautiful, it is not just the growing of the food that was transformational, but the offering of that food to the homeless of san francisco, that changed everything. there were, you know these guys would be let out of jail and wanted to stay in so they could work with katherine. she opened up a halfway house garden. we became very good friends and continued to buy from them. ultim
safety by numbers. one last thing and that is about liability. when i hear about cycling in the u.s., people say, oh, but cycling is so dangerous. and then we say, no, cycling is not dangerous. cyclists hardly ever cause accidents. cars cause accidents. cars cause facilities and in the netherlands we have the philosophy that car drivers should realize that they're in a machine that can kill. and also from that on responsibility in taking liability. if a car drives over a child on a bike, no matter what happens, he is 100% liable for whatever happens. and even in the other cases, when a car goes in the collision with an adult on a bike, still there is at least 50% liability for the car driver. and when the car driver would say, but yeah, the cyclists made a very strange movement. then we would say in the netherlands, well, you know that's about cycling. so you should reduce your speed when you see the cycling, you just can't drive on with 40 or 45 miles an hour alongside cyclists because there is always the risk that something strange happens so that's important. jurisdiction. there
abstractions," a series of works that lit a bonfire in the u.s. congress and subsequently was decried and defended worldwide, a man who has continued to explore topics that others may see as off limits, andres serrano. thank you. that had to be a difficult period for you, a piece of art you created that involved a crucifix immersed in your own urine. i've heard observers say that if you did not know the content, you would think it was a very respectful piece of art, respectful towards religion. and yet the controversy surrounding that work led to jesse helms calling you a jerk on the floor of the u.s. congress, and you were-- you were vilified in the political world. what was that experience like? it was like something out of kafka where i wake up in the morning and found myself being denounced in congress. and of course, i never imagined that it would happen. the piece was not intended to be offensive or provocative, you know. at the time, i barely had any kind of reputation or audience so i didn't expect for it to do what it did. but, you know, it had its ups and downs, to say the l
the kids and the parents. so we weren't, we used to bring math classes over to chez panisse and feed them lunch. the teachers were having a meeting and i wanted them to incorporate these ideas. we had to feed them to them. we invited the principals for dinner and lunch. it was all through drawing them in through a pleasurable experience. once you get hooked, you see, on the flavors, you give very willingly. [laughter]. >> i want to get to soul food in a second. how do you answer? you pick a carrot? what is the education? what is the narrative? >> the math teachers bring their kids out into the garden. >> math? >> math, into the garden, we have a couple they decide they are measuring the beds. the kids are having a good time doing this thing because they were in their boots in the grass and picking a couple of ras berries on the way. hands on education is a way to really make an impression and have the education. so they are doing that. they are counting snails. >> counting snails. >> you know, there are so many ways. how many buckets of water does it take to water the bed? it is just very
problem. that is not good for business. for us, it is active transport, really important as a solution for being accessible. ok, does it work? yes. this is the city. at the red lines, these are the congestion. this is the pattern of workers who go to work in the morning and in the afternoon. most of the workers come from outside of the city of amsterdam. they come mostly by car, but also a big part from public transport. what was the conclusion of all the businesses? if we go on like this, we have a real big problem in one, two years, maybe a little bit longer, we will not have any mobility anymore in our own region. that was one of the reasons that businesses came together and they were thinking, what can we do, not for a long time because it takes time, but what can we do today that helps today? that is important for the accessibility, and accessibility is very important for good, competition against the other regions in europe. of course, it is very important for the quality of life. if we want to attract international business, we need to attract people from outside. they only come
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)